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A microfluidics based drug screening platform for human tau mutation neurons (Project concluded)

The aim of the project is to investigate network formation by induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cortical neurons using microfluidic devices. Two populations of neurons that are environmentally isolated will be grown on compartmentalised microstructures. The sub-networks of connected neurons will be assessed for synaptic communication between the two environmentally isolated cultures by synaptophysin immunostaining within the microchannels and verification by calcium imaging studies. Thus the microfluidics device will be used to functionally characterise neuronal network formation by iPSC-derived neurons.

NP1.


Dr Graham Robertson

Co-Investigators:

Dr S. Wray, UCL

Prof. J. Hardy, UCL

Dr M. Zagnoni, Univ. Strathclyde

Dr T. Bushell, Univ. Strathclyde

Roslin Cells

Rbiomedical


Developing an assay to measure neuron-to-neuron spread of α-synuclein pathology on a microfluidics platform

The overall aim of this project is to establish a novel and robust microfluidic neuronal network system to quantitatively measure the pathological spread of αSyn between human neurons. This assay system will serve as a platform to test novel therapeutics targeted at preventing αSyn pathology and transmission.

NP2.


Dr Karamjit Singh Dolt

Co-Investigators:

Dr T. Kunath, Univ. Edinburgh

Dr M. Zagnoni, Univ. Strathclyde

UCB Biopharma


Developing microfluidic systems for high-throughput studies of functional neuronal networks (Project concluded)

The aim of this project is to develop novel miniaturised systems for advanced culture and patterning of neurons that will allow pharmacological investigation of cellular activity and network communication. Development of these systems will be a significant step forward in CNS drug discovery studies, as well as allowing the investigation of cellular and sub-cellular activity under conditions mimicking those proposed to underlie CNS disorders.

NP3.


Christopher MacKerron

Co-Investigators:

Dr M. Zagnoni, Univ. Strathclyde

Dr T. Bushell, Univ. Strathclyde


Three-dimensional modelling of endothelial cell dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease (Project concluded)

This project aims to generate a novel and better model of small vessel disease. It combines our expertise in endothelial cells with expertise in engineering and microfluidics to generate models of perfusable small vessels to study under the microscope. This will allow us to see how dysfunctional endothelial cells cope with changes in blood/fluid pressure, high sugar and cigarette chemicals, and whether these risk factors can cause dysfunctional endothelial cells.

NP4.


Dr Rikesh Rajani

Co-Investigators:

Dr A. Williams, Univ. Edinburgh

Dr M. Zagnoni, Univ. Strathclyde

Prof C. Smith, Univ. Edinburgh

Dr J. Wardlaw, Univ. Edinburgh


An in vitro microfluidic model of microglia migration in stroke (Project concluded)

The aim of the project is to validate and characterise an in vitro model of microglia migration which represents the physiological environment post stroke. By harnessing microfluidic technology, chemical gradients can be established within the device which are ideal to examine migration in conditions that are representative of the in vivo microenvironment.

NP5.


Samantha White

Co-Investigators:

Dr H. Carswell, Univ. Strathclyde

Dr M. Zagnoni, Univ. Strathclyde

Dr B. McCall, Univ. Edinburgh


Development of a microfluidic assay to study migration of cells essential for remyelination in MS lesions

The aim of the project is to use microfluidic technology to generate a chemorepellent concentration gradient for monitoring OPC/microglia migration and develop an assay suitable for high throughput screening. Optimization of the assay will produce a robust method for identification of chemorepulsion inhibitors. Selected hits will represent potential candidates for regenerative therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

NP6.


Dr Roberta Felici

Co-Investigators:

Dr M. Zagnoni, Univ. Strathclyde

Dr A. Williams, Univ. Edinburgh


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